grief studies
May 26, 2020
When to date again

When To Date Again

I am a bereavement counselor at a hospice. I have a client who has done amazing work after the death of her husband. She is in her mid-60’s and very healthy. She and her husband had counseling before his death, and she continued after his death. She has written, and written, and read everything she can get her hands on. She has recently met a man in whom she is romantically interested who is concerned she has not grieved enough.
May 24, 2020
Bereaved families

Those Left Behind: Working With Suicide-Bereaved families

Rumination is common in individuals experiencing suicide bereavement and is unique compared with the responses to bereavement for other reasons. Suicide, the tenth leading cause of death in the United States, is on the rise. In 2016, nearly 45,000 Americans 10 or older died by suicide, up by 30% since 1999. An individual’s death by suicide has far-reaching effects on a wide range of people, including immediate and extended family, friends, acquaintances, and healthcare and mental health professionals.
May 25, 2020
When My Dog Died

When My Dog Died

No one ever tells you that begging for a dog as an 11-year-old could affect you deeply as an adult. They just make you promise to clean up after the animal. But when Rainbow was 10, my parents moved abroad, and she came to live with me in New York. At first, she couldn’t figure out how to pee on concrete; she cried a lot, so I cried a lot. Eventually we learned how to communicate, even as she lost her vision, her hearing, her continence.
May 25, 2020
Miscarriage and Ectopic Pregnancy

Miscarriage and Ectopic Pregnancy

One in six women experience long-term post-traumatic stress following miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy. This is the finding of the largest ever study into the psychological impact of early-stage pregnancy loss, from scientists at Imperial College London and KU Leuven in Belgium. The research, published in the journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, studied over 650 women who had experienced an early pregnancy loss, of whom the majority had suffered an early miscarriage
May 25, 2020
Coping With Grief

Coping With Grief

Losing someone you love can change your world. You miss the person who has died and want them back. You may feel sad, alone, or even angry. You might have trouble concentrating or sleeping. If you were a busy caregiver, you might feel lost when you’re suddenly faced with lots of unscheduled time. These feelings are normal. There’s no right or wrong way to mourn.Losing someone you love can change your world. You miss the person who has died and want them back. You may feel sad, alone, or even angry.
May 26, 2020
The Brain’s Pathway To Imagination

The Brain’s Pathway To Imagination May Hold The Key To Altruistic Behavior

In those split seconds when people witness others in distress, neural pathways in the brain support the drive to help through facets of imagination that allow people to see the episode as it unfolds and envision how to aid those in need, according to a team of Boston College researchers. The underlying process at work is referred to as episodic simulation, essentially the ability of individuals to re-organize memories from the past
May 26, 2020
Post-Traumatic Stress

Survivors’ Near-Miss Experiences On 9/11 Linked To Post-Traumatic Stress

People who narrowly avoid disaster do not necessarily escape tragedy unharmed, and their knowledge of the victims' fate shapes how survivors respond to traumatic events, according to the results of a new paper by a University at Buffalo psychologist that explores the effects of near-miss experiences associated with the 9/11 terrorist attacks.
May 27, 2020
Mindfulness For Middleschool Students

Mindfulness For Middleschool Students

Two new studies from MIT suggest that mindfulness -- the practice of focusing one's awareness on the present moment -- can enhance academic performance and mental health in middle schoolers. The researchers found that more mindfulness correlates with better academic performance, fewer suspensions from school, and less stress. "By definition, mindfulness is the ability to focus attention on the present moment, as opposed to being distracted by external things or internal thoughts.
May 27, 2020
Self Acceptance

Self Acceptance Is The Key To Happiness

Happiness is more than just a feeling; it is something we can all practise on a daily basis. But people are better at some 'happy habits' than others. In fact, the one habit that corresponds most closely with us being satisfied with our lives overall -- self-acceptance -- is often the one we practise least. 5,000 people surveyed by the charity Action for Happiness, in collaboration with Do Something Different, rated themselves between 1 and 10 on ten habits identified from the latest scientific research as being key to happiness.
May 27, 2020
Triggers That Call Their Names

Triggers That Call Their Names

Motions of grief are always there, and they can be activated by our own directed thought or by unconscious reactions to stimuli that I call ‘sense triggers’. Every one of our six senses can trigger thoughts of our children. To others I may appear normal and even be engaged in intent conversation, driving, walking, at work, at play, in line at the movies. I will carry on my normal routine day as best I can the rest of my life. I do my job and pay the bills. But underneath that ‘normal routine’ there are still receptors for hundreds of triggers
May 26, 2020
Depression – Last Year Of Life

Depression – Last Year Of Life

Depression impacts quality of life at all life stages, but little is known about the factors related to depression in the last year of life. A recent study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found that 59.3% of individuals had depression in the last month before death. In the interview-based study that included 3,274 individuals who died by the end of the study, depression symptoms increased gradually from 12 to 4 months before death and then escalated from 4 to 1 months before death.
May 26, 2020
Life Is Imminent

How Professionals Can Deal With Families When End Of Life Is Imminent

My question is about anticipatory grief, the distress that family members can feel when a loved one is receiving end-of-life care. I work in a palliative care unit of a large hospital, and we often have families who are overwhelmed with the reality of the patient’s impending death, to a point that they can’t take in the message that further treatment is medically futile–no amount of heroic interventions can restore the person to health, but only prolong the patient’s suffering. Almost always we can control the patient’s pain,